• image
  • image
  • image
  • image
  • image
  • image
  • image
  • image
  • image
  • image
  • image
  • image

JP9183 Master of Sacred Theology Lecture

The Masters of Theology Public Lecture is a requirement that must be delivered prior to completion of the Master of Sacred Theology and be considered by the Director to have done so satisfactorily. By arrangement with the Dean or Associate Dean (Teaching and Learning), the candidate must agree to a time when faculty members can attend a one hour session in which the student will deliver the Master of Theology Public Lecture. The Registrar is to be notified and he is to ensure that all students and faculty of the Institute are invited to attend the event.

The candidate should present on a topic of his or her choosing for 30-40 minutes followed by a period of discussion.

The MST Public Lecture is assessed by the faculty who are present. Taking into account the time restraints, the members of faculty must advise the Dean whether the candidate has satisfactorily:

  • provided evidence of advanced knowledge of the critical areas relevant to the topic which must fall within at least one of the critical areas of philosophical and theological anthropology, the theology of the body, the sacramentality of marriage, or the theology of culture that are relevant to the aims of the Institute in relation to marriage and family;
  • shown a comprehension and evaluated the streams of thought within the Catholic tradition relevant to the topic;
  • demonstrated a high order of skill in being able to analyse new trends and concepts in marriage and family issues relevant to the topic, and critically evaluate the alternative perspectives, and utilise a broad range of sources;
  • demonstrated creativity and flexibility and the capacity to think rigorously and independently in the application of knowledge and skills to the topic;
  • shown an ability to openly and constructively discuss a wide range of types of moral reasoning applied to marriage and family life;
  • if relevant to the topic, applied the pastoral teaching of the Church to assist in the health and well-being of marriage and family;
  • held and defended a principled position in peer discussion on an issue affecting marriage and family within the Christian tradition;
  • demonstrated use of appropriate research methods for theological research; and
  • demonstrated the capacity to present at a tertiary level.